Guidance for Primary Care Trusts as responsible authorities

 

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Guidance for Primary Care Trusts as
responsible authorities

Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) in England became responsible
authorities
under the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, amended by
the Police Reform Act 2002, on 30th April 2004. This means that now
PCTs have a statutory responsibility to work in partnership with
other responsible authorities, namely the police, fire and local
authorities and co-operating bodies to tackle crime, disorder and
the misuse of drugs. This document provides guidance on how to
fulfil these new responsibilities

Title: Guidance For Partnerships and Primary Care Trusts
(PCTs) Commencement of PCTs as Responsible Authorities from 30 April
2004
Authors: Department of Health & Home Office
Number of pages: 31
Date published: August 2004

The cost of crime has a major impact on the NHS:

  • 116,000 NHS staff were the victims of violence and aggression
    in 2002-03

  • Bed days related to crime and disorder costs the NHS between
    �1.1 and �2.3 billion per year

  • Property damage, risk, liability or injury to staff costs
    between �300 million and �678 million per annum

  • The cost of Domestic Violence to the NHS for physical
    injuries is around �1.2 billion a year..

New Legislation

The Crime and Disorder Act 1998, amended by the Police Reform Act
2002, on 30th April 2004 places a duty on PCTs to:

  • participate in an audit of crime and disorder, anti-social
    behaviour and drug misuse for the Crime and Disorder Partnership
    (CDRP) area or areas in which they fall

  • contribute to the development of local strategies that
    effectively deal with the issues which are identified.

The first audit in which PCTs should participate needs to be
completed by the end of September 2004 and after consultation with
local communities the local CDRP must publish their strategy by
April 2005. The strategy will last for three years.

The extent to which the PCT is involved in the delivery of the
strategy is not specified. In practice this will be determined
through local negotiation and it is likely to be greatest in areas
where the delivery of action on drugs and crime and disorder makes a
significant contribution to the PCTs own national or local
priorities.

Action in support of the local Crime and Disorder Strategies may
impact positively on a range of national NHS priorities including:

  • Reducing health inequalities.

  • Positive patient satisfaction surveys.

  • Positive staff satisfaction surveys.

  • Improvement in the life chances for children.

  • Increasing the participation of problem drug users in
    treatment.

  • Implementation of the National Service Framework for Mental
    Health.

  • Reductions in waiting times.

Getting a copy

Download
Guidance For Partnerships and Primary Care Trusts (PCTs)
Commencement of PCTs as Responsible Authorities from 30 April 2004

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Last update:  16 September 2004

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